School funding cuts will damage economy, city councils warn

17-02-2017

School funding cuts will affect the quality of education children receive, starve businesses of skilled employees and ultimately damage the prospects of the UK economy, according to London Councils and Core Cities UK, which represent local authorities in London, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle, Nottingham and Sheffield.

In a joint letter to Ms Greening, both groups say squeezed budgets could damage city growth and development. They urge the government to invest £335 million nationally to enable the new funding formula to be introduced without any funding cuts to any schools in the country.

Judith Blake, leader of Core Cities UK, said: “Together, London Councils and the Core Cities represent areas that drive 50 per cent of the UK economy, which is why we are urging government to recognise that reducing funding for our schools will deal a huge blow to growth and productivity.

“If we do not act now, local labour markets in the UK’s most productive cities will not have access to the right mix of skills to attract and retain business.”

Claire Kober, chair of London Councils, said: “Transforming school performance requires both leadership and investment, which is why we are calling on government to find an additional £335 million to ensure no school loses out as a result of the national funding formula.

“Finding additional resources can be a challenge, but failing to invest in schools now will have a range of damaging consequences, not only on young people themselves but on the cities they live in too.”


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